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Saturday, January 31, 2009

Caracas synagogue defaced with anti-Semitic graffiti

Posted: 01:24 PM ET
CARACAS, Venezuela (CNN) — Armed men forced their way into a Caracas synagogue, defacing its administrative offices with anti-Semitic graffiti and vandalizing an interior room where the Torah is kept, officials said.
About 15 men forced their way into the Mariperez Synagogue about 10 p.m. Friday night, staying until about 3 a.m., police said. They tied up a security guard at the synagogue before vandalizing the rooms.
Graffiti left at the scene included the phrases, “Damn the Jews,” “Jews out of here” and “Israel assassins.” The men also left behind a picture of a devil, authorities said. The men also stole computers and administrative papers or documents, officials said. They did not cover their faces, but took the recordings from security cameras with them.

Minister of Defense at Assembly of God Church

Saturday, January 17, 2009

Hugo Chavez Insulted Obama with Racist Slang

On a public radio & tv address Venezuela's tyrant Hugo Chavez compared Obama with "Miasma", he said "You are a miasma, for not say other thing".

Miasma is a form of pollution that was declared as the caused of the "Black Death", according to the Miasmatic Theory of Disease. More info on this Wiki site.

If you can stand listening to this monster's poo (what I can't), here is the video

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

NYT: Chávez Reopens Oil Bids to West as Prices Plunge

Chávez Reopens Oil Bids to West as Prices Plunge

Published: January 14, 2009
CARACAS, Venezuela — President Hugo Chávez, buffeted by falling oil prices that threaten to damage his efforts to establish a Socialist-inspired state, is quietly courting Western oil companies once again.
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Thomas Coex/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
President Hugo Chávez is expected to put forth a referendum this year that would let him run for indefinite re-election.

Related

The Perils of Petrocracy (November 4, 2007)

Times Topics: Hugo Chavez | Venezuela

Meridith Kohut for The New York Times
Social programs like food subsidies, which these women in Caracas picked up, are financed by Petróleos de Venezuela’s profits.
Until recently, Mr. Chávez had pushed foreign oil companies here into a corner by nationalizing their oil fields, raiding their offices with tax authorities and imposing a series of royalties increases.
But faced with the plunge in prices and a decline in domestic production, senior officials have begun soliciting bids from some of the largest Western oil companies in recent weeks — including Chevron, Royal Dutch/Shell and Total of France — promising them access to some of the world’s largest petroleum reserves, according to energy executives and industry consultants here.
Their willingness to even consider investing in Venezuela reflects the scarcity of projects open to foreign companies in other top oil nations, particularly in the Middle East.
But the shift also shows how the global financial crisis is hampering Mr. Chávez’s ideological agenda and demanding his pragmatic side. At stake are no less than Venezuela’s economic stability and the sustainability of his rule. With oil prices so low, the longstanding problems plaguing Petróleos de Venezuela, the national oil company that helps keep the country afloat, have become much harder to ignore.
Embracing the Western companies may be the only way to shore up Petróleos de Venezuela and the raft of social welfare programs, like health care and higher education for the poor, that have been made possible by oil proceeds and have helped bolster his popular support.
“If re-engaging with foreign oil companies is necessary to his political survival, then Chávez will do it,” said Roger Tissot, an authority on Venezuela’s oil industry at Gas Energy, a Brazilian consulting company focusing on Latin America. “He is a military man who understands losing a battle to win the war.”
While the new oil projects would not be completed for years, Mr. Chávez is already looking beyond the end of his current term in 2012 by putting forward a referendum, expected as early as next month, that would let him run for indefinite re-election.
In recent years, Mr. Chávez has preferred partnerships with national oil companies from countries like Iran, China and Belarus. But these ventures failed to reverse Venezuela’s declining oil output. State-controlled oil companies from other nations have also been invited to bid this time, but the large private companies are seen as having an advantage, given their expertise in building complex projects in Venezuela and elsewhere in years past.
The bidding process was first conceived last year when oil prices were higher but Petróleos de Venezuela’s production decline was getting impossible to overlook. Still, the process is moving into high gear only this month, with the authorities here expected to start reviewing the companies’ bidding plans on new areas of the Orinoco Belt, an area in southern Venezuela with an estimated 235 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Altogether, more than $20 billion in investment could be required to assemble devilishly complex projects capable of producing a combined 1.2 million barrels of oil a day.
Mr. Chávez’s olive branch to Western oil companies comes after he nationalized their oil fields in 2007. Two companies, Exxon Mobil and ConocoPhillips, left Venezuela and are still waging legal battles over lost projects.
But Venezuela may have little choice but to form new ventures with foreign oil companies. Nationalizations in other sectors, like agriculture and steel manufacturing, are fueling capital flight, leaving Venezuela reliant on oil for about 93 percent of its export revenue in 2008, up from 69 percent in 1998 when Mr. Chávez was first elected.
In the past year, with higher oil prices paving the way, Mr. Chávez also vastly expanded Petróleos de Venezuela’s power, inextricably linking it to his political program. He directed the oil company to build roads, import and distribute food, build docks and shipyards and set up a light-bulb factory. He even expanded it into areas like milk production, soybean farming and the training of athletes after a weak performance at the Beijing Olympics.
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