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Thursday, April 10, 2008

Is Hugo Chavez Friends with FARC?

Today, the president or secretary or whatever, the leader of the OAS, José Miguel Insulza (in Spanish means insipid) was interpellated by the US Congress, about the conflict Ecuador - Colombia - Venezuela.

To a question about if Hugo Chavez has relations with terrorism, Mr. Insipid (who is planning his presidential campaign in Chile) definitively respond 'Chavez doesn't support terrorism, there are no prooves'.

Updated: I hear that some 'progressive' journalist named
Greg Palast don't believed this and apparently, although he call himself 'progressive' is ok to supporting Chavez for killing people, arrest political prisoner, and shutdown TV & Radio station, among other things. Not to mention his views about 9/11. This guy is only a Brush critic, also I am, but that doesn't mean I should support a dictator like Hugo Chavez, I wondering if he supports Iran Regime and the assassination of people just because they are gay. Greg, I'm waiting for your respond, oh, also, Have you been in Venezuela?, because you should have lived in Venezuela for the last 2 years at least in order to talk with convincing. Oh, and why don't talk about Fidel Castro, is it OK Fidel Castro?, is Cuba the Heaven on Earth?, why don't you go and live there?

In what World this guy (Mr. Insipid from OAS) is living. I leave you with an article from Germany Magazine Der Spiegel.

DANGEROUS LIAISON

Is Hugo Chavez Friends with FARC?

By Jens Glüsing

A spectacular find may prove what many have long suspected. E-mails and other files found on a FARC laptop in the jungles of Ecuador show that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez may have close relations with the terror group.

When police stormed a house near San José, the capital of Costa Rica, they knew exactly what they were looking for. Immediately, the officers headed for a backroom where they found an old safe packed with bundles of dollars -- wrapped like cocaine in plastic.

Many of the bills were stuck together; some were already so rotten that they could hardly be counted. But the police knew the sum anyway: $480,000 (€305,000). The cash had been mentioned by Raul Reyes -- the number-two man in the Colombian Marxist guerrilla organization known as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) -- in an e-mail to Rodrigo Granda, known as the "chancellor" of the rebel group. Granda was to use the money to finance international activities. The address where the stash was to be found was also mentioned in the message.

The $480,000 e-mail was one of hundreds of documents found on Reyes’ laptop. Colombian troops had killed the sleeping guerrilla leader in early March during a pre-dawn bombing raid on a FARC camp in Ecuador -- and secured the laptop. It was found together with three other computers and a number of compact discs in a suitcase that survived the attack.

30 Kilos of Uranium

Interpol specialists are currently analyzing the recovered data. Some of the information has been encrypted, but most of the files are easily accessible. Reyes felt safe in his camp, less than two kilometers (1.25 miles) from the Colombian border. In roughly two weeks, Interpol Secretary General Ronald Noble plans to announce the results of the investigation. But one thing is already clear: the laptops contain a political bombshell. They hold detailed information on FARC's relations outside of Colombia, the group' finances, their smuggling routes and records for cocaine deliveries. There are also details of bomb attacks carried out be the group.

The seized files also allowed police to track down 30 kilos (66 pounds) of uranium, which had been hidden in a village near the Colombian capital Bogotá and possibly belonged to the guerrillas. Although the material is not suitable for manufacturing bombs, it could be used to produce special ammunition capable of piercing armored vehicles. ...

Need More?, this is a brief part of an extensive report from this magazine and can be read fully clicking here






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